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Bacterial Meningitis Vaccination and Information

Published or Revised September 11, 2012

Beginning January, 2012, an entering student who has been admitted to an institution of higher education or private or independent institution of higher education must show evidence of receipt of an initial bacterial meningitis vaccination dose or booster during the five-year period preceding and at least 10 days prior to the first day of the first semester in which the student initially enrolls at an institution, or following a break in enrollment of at least one fall or spring semester at the same or another institution.

A student is not required to submit evidence of receiving the vaccination against bacterial meningitis or evidence of receiving a booster dose if the student is 30 years of age or older or if the student is enrolled only in online or other distance education courses that don’t require proctored testing at PJC.

Evidence of Vaccination

Acceptable evidence of vaccination or receiving a booster dose includes:

Exemptions

A student, or a parent or guardian of a student, is not required to submit evidence of receiving the vaccination against bacterial meningitis if the student, or a parent or guardian of a student, submits to the institution:

All students should consult a physician about the need for immunization to prevent bacterial meningitis.

About Bacterial Meningitis

This information is being provided to all new college students in the State of Texas. Bacterial Meningitis is a serious, potentially deadly disease that can progress extremely fast — so take utmost caution. It is an inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The bacteria that causes meningitis can also infect the blood. This disease strikes about 3,000 Americans every year, including 100-125 on college campuses, leading to 5-15 deaths among college students every year. There is a treatment, but those who survive may develop severe health problems or disabilities.

What are the Symptoms?

There may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots caused by bleeding under the skin. These can occur anywhere on the body.

The more symptoms, the higher the risk, so when these symptoms appear seek immediate medical attention.

How is Bacterial Meningitis Diagnosed?

How is the Disease Transmitted?

How do you increase your risk?

What are the possible consequences of the disease?

Can the disease be treated?

How can I find out more?

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